Is Urinary Incontinence Prevalent in Women Throughout Their Adult Lifespan?

Is Urinary Incontinence Prevalent in Women Throughout Their Adult Lifespan?

The question in the headline is more serious than any of us ever could have imagined – but why? Statistically speaking, there are over 20 million women in the U.S. that experience urinary incontinence on a day-to-day basis. What’s more, is that only 1 in 4 of those women actually seek out medical care; the rest simply use pads and diapers to control their bladder leakage, or they do nothing at all.

women, women Urinary Incontinence, Urinary Incontinence, health
Is Urinary Incontinence Prevalent in Women Throughout Their Adult Lifespan?  [ photo: pexels ]

In preparation for November, Bladder Health Awareness Month, we’ve gathered together the must-know information relating to urinary incontinence. Whether you’re reaching that age in your adult life where you may have to find a solution to a UI problem, or you’re searching for ways to stop a potential bladder leakage issue from happening in the future, you’ve come to the right place.

What are the main causes that contribute to unwanted UI symptoms?

UI is a medical condition that’s brought on by the weakening of the pelvic floor muscles. The majority of women acquire UI through diabetes, menopause, and hysterectomy procedures. Some women have to deal with urinary incontinence immediately after childbirth, and for a time after that, too.

Are there different types of UI?

The answer to that question is yes. There are three technical types of urinary incontinence, and they’re all summed up below.

Stress urinary incontinence: Bladder leakage that occurs when laughing, coughing, sneezing, performing physical activity, or over-exerting oneself.

Urgency urinary incontinence: Bladder leakage that occurs when a sudden urge to urinate comes on.

Mixed urinary incontinence: Bladder leakage that occurs when laughing, coughing, sneezing, performing physical activity, over-exerting oneself AND when a sudden urge to urinate comes on. Symptoms from both stress-related and urgent-related urinary incontinence may occur.

Unsure which type of UI you suffer from? You can take the free quiz at http://www.pelvicscore.com/ and rate your symptoms.

What can be done to help women with UI?

Traditional care is usually implemented by an experienced and authorized physical therapist. He or she is trained to help women strengthen their pelvic floor muscles through a series of exercises.

If you have urinary incontinence, you can do these exercises at home with correct instruction. You do have that choice. However, a whopping 75% of women with the condition do not follow through with the exercises – and of that, less than 25% of those women know how to perform them the right way, to strengthen their pelvic floor muscles.

Is there an alternative that can help with urinary incontinence?

Bladder Health Awareness Month is right around the corner, and we’re ecstatic to share a new alternative with all of you ladies out there struggling to deal with this medical condition.

leva, a new Pelvic Digital Therapeutic, has been cleared by the FDA for women with UI. This prescription-only, intravaginal accelerometer-based device analyzes and detects pelvic floor movement in the moment. 

In fact, it mirrors the motion of your pelvic floor while you’re going through the exercise motions, to make sure that you’re doing everything correctly to benefit your bladder health. All it takes is 2 ½ minutes twice a day, and you’ll be on your way to a strong pelvic floor in as little as six weeks.

The benefits of leva don’t stop there, though. If you like what you’ve heard so far, head on over knowleva.com to read on and learn more. 

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